Getting started with digital teaching

Getting started with digital teaching

The Centre for Digitally Supported Learning (CDUL) has compiled a number of guides on how teachers and supervisors at AAU can digitise their teaching and supervision.

There are many options when you want to make your teaching digital. To a large extent, it’s about finding the format that best suits the way you normally teach, and the format that you are most comfortable using. Furthermore, it’s always a good idea to discuss your thoughts with a colleague.

One of the advantages of digital teaching is that you have the option to teach in ways that differ from your normal practice. For example, you can record a video that your students can view whenever it suits them. This is referred to as an asynchronous solution, as opposed to e.g. live streaming the lecture, which is referred to as a synchronous solution. AAU currently recommends asynchronous teaching as the primary form of teaching. Other asynchronous formats include PowerPoints with speech, recordings of your screen (screencasts), recordings of your screen while you draw (pencasts) and external videos from e.g. YouTube or podcasts. In addition, it is possible to supplement your primary lessons with quizzes, peer-to-peer learning (when students learn from each other) or other formats.  

Examples of digital lectures 

  • Recorded video lectures
  • Podcasts, screencasts and pencasts.

CDUL encourages using a mix of formats and teaching options in a way that makes sense in terms of the individual’s teaching, digital literacy and educational practice. 

Good advice

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    5 tips

    If you are about to do a video lecture for the first time, we have gathered 5 tips for you here:  

    1. Limit the time
    It’s better to make several short videos than one long one. We recommend a maximum of 20 mins. per video.
     
    2. Stick to one topic
    In line with keeping your video short, we recommend that you stick to one topic per video.

    3. Plan with keywords
    Plan your video with keywords, a script or storyboard so you don’t go off on a tangent.
     
    4. Forget your vanity 
    Forget your vanity – in terms of both video and speech. If you don’t feel comfortable in front of the camera, choose a video format where you will not be shown on screen.
     
    5. Quick and dirty
    Start small and do short teaching videos that do not require editing

Planned Activities

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    ASSIGNMENT WORK IN GROUPS

    Assignment work in groups could include e.g. seminars, assignments or other course teaching. We currently recommend that you use solutions that work with the following technologies:

    Platforms that support activities that do not require immediate feedback:

    • Moodle 
    • Microsoft Teams
    • Panopto
    • Kahoot

    Platforms that support activities that require immediate feedback:

    • Microsoft Teams 
    • SfB 

    Find instructions here.

    IF YOU DEFINED THE ASSIGNMENTS IN ADVANCE 

    You can create an activity (a plug-in) called “forum” on the Moodle page linked to your lecture. Moodle forum can be used for assignments and to allow students to ask questions about the assignments that they would have previously asked in class.

    Find instructions for Moodle here.

    Find more inspiration here.

    IF THE STUDENTS ARE TO DEFINE ASSIGNMENTS 

    With Moodle forum, you have many different options. Creating a Moodle forum for each course session is a good idea, as this ensures that the course sessions do not get mixed up and it allows students to create questions as new threads/“discussion topics”.

    See general guidance on the use of Moodle forum here

     

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    For Students

    We currently recommend that students use solutions that work with the following technologies:

    • Microsoft Teams  
    • SharePoint  
    • Onedrive 
    • Word Online 

    Find instructions here.

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    Lecture

    We currently recommend that you work with the following technologies:

    • Panopto
    • Screencast recordings/pencast recordings (Panopto as a rule, otherwise recorded on an iPad and uploaded to Panopto)
    • PowerPoint with narration 
    • Moodle 

    Find instructions here.

    IF YOU HAVE POWERPOINT SLIDES 

    With a few simple steps, you can record an audio track for your slides and save them as a video before you upload them to Moodle.
    You can write explanatory notes for the students on each slide before you upload them to Moodle.

    Find instructions here.

    IF YOU WOULD HAVE USED THE WHITEBOARD

    You can draw, speak and write while recording your screen. This can then be converted into a video that you can upload to Moodle via Panopto.

    Find instructions here.

     

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    Supervision

    We currently recommend that you use solutions that work with the following technologies:

    Platforms that can replace ‘face-to-face’ supervision:

    • Microsoft Teams 
    • SfB 

    Platforms that can support the above:

    • Microsoft Teams 
    • Outlook 
    • Word Online 

    Find instructions here.

    MICROSOFT TEAMS

    Microsoft Teams is a communication and collaboration platform that combines video conferencing, chat, file sharing and project management tools. The platform can support the students’ project work and facilitate supervisory work by merging options for online meetings, screen sharing, communication and file sharing with students.

    Find instructions here.


    SKYPE FOR BUSINESS 

    Like Microsoft Teams, Skype for Business supports chat, video conferencing and the option to share both the screen and files during the meeting. Skype for Business does not support continuous written supervision.

    Find instructions here.

     

     

IT tools - Not supported (For the experienced user. If not use recommended tools)